Brownie Buttercream Cookies

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It’s been said that necessity is the mother of invention. I think that totally absurd.

In my house, chocolate cravings are the mother of invention, and you can quote me on that until I start selling chocolate hot tubs for soaking in (why hasn’t anyone yet invented chocolate hot tubs? Blaring omission in basic human comfort, I say) or redecorate in the style of Willy Wonka (I consider it daily).

Chocolate cravings are responsible for a whole heck of a lot of recipes around this place. Try as I might to deny their power, they return time and time again and insist I turn the kitchen a laboratory of cocoa creation.

Such was the case when the fam and I were gathered around the table last weekend, playing a rousing rendition of Pit. We all decided the game would be greatly enhanced with the additon of chocolate (isn’t everything?). But who had time to wait for a whole hunk of brownies to bake? Not us. So, we pulled out the electric mixer, grabbed the cocoa powder, and started concocting. Within 20 minutes, we had ourselves these delicious little Brownie Cookie Bites.

All we needed was a giant tub of chocolate milk in which to soak them. Patent pending.

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Brownie Buttercream Cookies

Ingredients:

FOR THE COOKIES:
1/4 cup butter, softened
1/4 cup light olive oil
1 cup brown sugar
2 eggs
3/4 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1 3/4 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla

FOR THE CHOCOLATE BUTTERCREAM:
1 pound powdered sugar
1/2 cup cocoa
1 stick butter, softened
1 teaspoon vanilla
2-4 tablespoons whole milk

Directions:

FOR THE COOKIES:
In a large bowl, cream together butter, oil, brown sugar, and eggs until fluffy. Add the remaining ingredients, and beat until incorporated. Using a medium cookie scoop, scoop the dough onto a baking sheet. Press the round of each cookie down with two fingers to flatten the dough slightly. Bake in an oven preheated to 400 degrees for 9-11 minutes, you're looking for the outside of the cookies to crack and puff slightly, but be careful to not overcook them, lest they lose their tender chewy insides. Remove & cool completely before frosting.

FOR THE FROSTING:
In an electric mixer, beat all ingredients together until very, very, very fluffy. Frost on cooled Brownie Cookies.

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New Friends Are So Nice! This month I’m joining forces with Smithfield, a new cooking venture I’m thrilled to be part of. To learn more about what I’ll be doing with their company, stop on by and say hello! I’d love to have you join me for lots of real-world recipes, ideas, and kitchen tips. Good stuff going on over there, don’t miss it!

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5 Responses to “Brownie Buttercream Cookies”

  1. 1

    April on February 18, 2011 at 8:37 pm Reply

    I just tried these, and they were delicious! I’m trying to do more cooking for myself, and I think I’ll be visiting this blog regularly.

    • Brooke replied: — February 18th, 2011 @ 10:59 pm

      April, I’m so glad they worked! Hooray! And, stop by anytime. You’re always welcome!

  2. Pingback: Super Bowl Sundaes | The Family Kitchen

  3. 2

    Maximo Kuthe on April 22, 2013 at 12:25 pm Reply

    There are three main myths about the creation of the brownie. The first, that a chef accidentally added melted chocolate to biscuit dough. The second, a cook forgot to add flour to the batter. And thirdly, the most popular belief, that a housewife did not have baking powder and improvised with this new treat. It was said that she was baking for guests and decided to serve these flattened cakes to them. This became our beloved treat of today. Whatever may be the case; all three myths have gained popularity throughout the years due to its mysterious beginnings.’

    Catch ya later
    http://www.caramoan.co/caramoan-package

  4. 3

    Zachary Tomblin on May 18, 2013 at 7:30 pm Reply

    The wood tubs are not a new concept; they were used for centuries all over the world. It was during the Second World War that the Americans noticed the wood soaking tubs in Japan. They converted the wooden wine vats into wooden hot tubs. So the Americans experienced the social bathing with wooden hot tubs. Today though acrylic spas are more prevalent, wooden tubs are also being purchased mostly on personal preference. However, there are many reasons for choosing a wooden tub over a plastic spa.:”.”

    http://caramoan.co

    Good day

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