Easter Bunny Soup {Vegan}

Ever since we’ve started eating vegan foods around this here house of mine, I’ve been trying to come up with a better way to explain our eating habits. After all, even hard-core veganista’s (like the beautiful, talented Ruby Roth, author of Vegan is Love) admit being wary to saying the big, fat “V” word. VEGAN. It’s like the mark of the demon, labeling you as a radical food extremist. When, really what you are is just a person who loves your body and the world too much to cut into a cow for dinner.

A few weeks ago, I chatted with Kim Barnouin of Skinny Bitch fame, and told her I was determined to come up with a better way to say “vegan” than “vegan.” She giggled and said, “Oh I am so on board with this. There has GOT to be better term out there. Tell me if you figure it out, because I want to start using it.”

Sometime mid-dinner making last Wednesday, it hit me. I would no longer tell my kids that dinner was “vegan.” No. As much as I love the description of vegan eating, it feels too harsh sometimes. I don’t want to raise my kids with labels. I want to teach them to look past labels and seek to fill their souls (and their bellies) with stuff that heals and makes them whole. Right now, with the best scientific understanding I can muster, a mostly-vegan, plant-based diet seems to be the clearest approach to wellness. However, I want them to always stay curious, to be open to new truths that may help them find an ever better, more healthy way to be.

And so, in conjuring up an Easter bunny inspired carrot soup, it came to me. The meal I was making wasn’t for carnivores. It didn’t require viciously sharp eye teeth or the cooking off of blood and bacteria. Rather, this meal was for plant-eaters. And then it hit me…it was a plantie meal.

How ca-ute is that.

Plantie.

So, while I really want to toss out labels and get my kids to eat real food because it tastes good and their mama makes it fun to choose carrots over cupcakes (although, God bless cupcakes), I do kinda dig the rather jaunty term of “Plantie” eating to help my kids understand how to make the most healthful selections for their cute bods.

Here’s the thing. Eating plantie food really is fun. You’ve just gotta have the right ingredients. Not a lot of ingredients. Not weird ingredients. Just the right ones.

In this pretty recipe for Easter Bunny Soup, mini carrots are cooked into a chicken-noodle-soupish broth flavored with a bit of mellow, white miso (known for it’s breast cancer fighting powers) stirred together with fresh herbs, and served up quick and hot in less than thirty minutes.

What better way to celebrate the season of new beginnings and rebirth than to create a meal for your family that blesses their insides, fills them with nutrients, and makes for a perfect meal just in case the Easter Bunny stops by for a treat?

I don’t so much like labels, but this is one meal that makes me think it wouldn’t be so bad to tell the world I’m a plantie.

Happy Spring. 

Print

Bunny Carrot Soup {Vegan}

Ingredients:

1 tablespoon of Earth Balance
1/4 cup diced celery
1/4 cup diced onions
10 cups water
2 tablespoons Better than Boullion veggie-base
15-20 mini carrots
1 1/2 cup orecchiette rigate pasta
2 tablespoons white miso, optional (found in the refrigerator section of Whole Foods)
1 tablespoon of fresh chopped parsley, dill, & chives

Directions:

In a large pot, melt the Earth Balance butter over medium-high heat. Add the celery and onions to the butter and cook until softened. Add the water and boullion. Bring to a boil. Add the carrots and pasta to the boiling water. Cook for 12-15 minutes, until the pasta is softened. Remove from heat, stir in the miso. Stir in the parsley, dill, and chives. Serve with crusty bread and enjoy!

 

  Pin It

6 Responses to “Easter Bunny Soup {Vegan}”

  1. 1

    Skye on April 6, 2012 at 12:11 pm Reply

    This looks delicious- and I have some miso in the fridge that is begging for me to finally use it! LOVE what you have to say about labels and how annoying it is to have others think you are a “radical food extremist”- and the term plantie is pretty awesome :)

  2. 2

    anna on April 6, 2012 at 9:39 pm Reply

    plantie. i love it.

  3. 3

    Kait on April 9, 2012 at 8:07 pm Reply

    I love it! I usually say “plant-based” but plantie takes less time!

    Is there a sub for the better-than-bouillon?

    • Brooke replied: — April 10th, 2012 @ 8:26 pm

      You can also used the “Not Chick’n” Boullion!

  4. Pingback: 8 Wonderful Dishes for a Vegan Easter | GoodVeg powered by Squidoo

  5. Pingback: TodaysMama.com - 7 Healthy Easter Side Dishes

Leave a Comment